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Thursday, September 26, 2013

The Bully Text: DoSomething.org




The Bully Text’ utilizes SMS to educate young people on how to step up to bullying in their community


DoSomething.org and The Wireless Foundation announce the launch of The Bully Text, a unique mobile experience that allows young people to walk through a day at a virtual high school to explore the ways that they can step up to bullies in common bullying situations. With an estimated 160,000 kids skipping school each day to avoid being bullied[1],  DoSomething.org developed The Bully Text to educate students on how to stop bullying in their schools.

The Bully Text is a text messaging game set during an imaginary first day of school. In the game, participants experience different bullying situations and are given options on how they can react. Depending on how the participant reacts in the different situations, they walk down different paths that each offer unique endings. The SMS education experience is meant to emulate common bullying situations, show different ways to react and offer an example of the impact of their actions. 

For the second year of The Bully Text, DoSomething.org found a natural partner in The Wireless Foundation and their mission: bringing organizations, people, and technology together so wireless innovations will continue to enhances lives in communities across the United States.  Last year over 68,000 young people took part in the campaign, and 89% of participants reported having a better idea of how to stop bullying in their school after playing the game. This year, young people who participate will be entered to win a $3,000 scholarship.

The Bully Text is part of DoSomething.org’s proprietary mobile gaming model – through which they built their mobile subscriber list to over 1.3 young people. With the average teen sending 3,339 texts a month and texts having a 99% open rate; SMS is a powerful tool to effectively engage young people on issues they care about.

“We all remember that moment, that feeling. You see something you don’t quite agree with in school, something you know is wrong. But do you act? It’s hard for young people to know how to deal with those situations first hand” said Greg Thomas, campaign manager at DoSomething.org. “Through The Bully Text, we’re providing young people with a chance to understand what it’s like to experience bullying through different roles, and reflect on how they can change their behavior to help them step up to bullying in their school.”

For full campaign details, visit www.dosomething.org/bullytext or text BULLY to 38383.



[1] National Association of School Psychologists (http://www.nasponline.org/)

Friday, September 20, 2013

Sticks & Stones: New Program Designed to Bring Parents and Teenagers Closer

The Sticks & Stones Seven-Week Program bridges the communication gap between parents and teenagers. The Program helps parents and teens learn how to work together to communicate more effectively and build a stronger bond.

Parents are always looking for new and creative ways to get their teens to communicate with them. Author Meaghan Roberts has just released her new program designed specifically to help parents create an environment where teenagers feel comfortable opening up.

The Program consists of two eBooks, Sticks & Stones and My Rock. Sticks & Stones is a self-help guide for teens concerning daily issues they deal with such as bullying, self-esteem and peer pressure. The guide is also an e-journal where teens can privately write their thoughts, feelings and questions. The purpose is to create a safe outlet for teens to express themselves. They will read one chapter a week and spend the remainder of the week reflecting and writing about what they learned. My Rock is a supplemental guide that gives parents insight on what their teens are reading each week as well as communicative skills to help facilitate a conversation with their teens. Each week, a day prior to reading a new chapter, parents and teens will meet to discuss what their teens have learned and any questions they have.

The Program is safe, secure and private.

Meaghan developed the Sticks & Stones Seven-Week Program because traditional parenting books offer advice to parents but none to teens. When parents apply the advice, their teens have no idea where the change is coming from. Teenagers are no longer children and can no longer be treated like children. The only way a parent-teen relationship can develop is if both parties are involved. The Sticks & Stones program encourages parents and teens to work together to build trust as well as prepare teens for conversations they will have with their parents.

The Sticks & Stones Program is available only at www.mysticksandstones.com

Contact Information
Meaghan@mysticksandstones.com

www.mysticksandstones.com

Monday, September 16, 2013

Bullying Under Attack: True Stories Written by Teen Victims, Bullies & Bystanders

WORDS ARE POWERFUL- they can inflict damage and they can heal.  In this anthology of first-person accounts written by teenagers for both their peers and adults, words transform pain into hope and the possibility for change.

Bullying Under Attack is an eye-opening anthology of all three players in the bullying cycle. These conversational essays on life as the bullied, the bully, and the bystander provide insight and inspiration for change. Rather than offer a cumbersome psychological breakdown, this graceful and hard-hitting book places the reader firmly in the shoes of all involved.

The stories written by The Bullied explain the subtleties and agony of harassment, helping readers understand that there is more to unkind words and behavior than "just joking around." Although many of these teens have suffered through harassment by their peers, their essays are both empowering and inspiring. By exploring the essays by The Bullies, readers will discover that the bullies are often times incorrectly labled as bad kids, but many are simply trying to fit in, despite their own insecurities and fears. While these bullies may still have their own seemingly insurmountable obstacles at home, they share their experiences and insights hoping to manage and reforming other bullies. The section voiced by The Bystander shares tales of those who have regrettably watched and those who have stepped up to help others. Here, readers will find the inspiration to speak out rather than just standing by while others are emotionally harmed.

Whether due to race, weight, or jealousy, there are a myriad of reasons WHY. Included in this startling compendium of personal stories that convey the complexity and nuances of what it means to be bullied, are stories of regret, promises, and encouragement that will help readers find solace during their teen years and show them how—as adults—their words and actions can provide strength and reassurance to others experiencing all aspects of bullying. Ultimately, they will learn to find their voices in order to break the cycle for good.

Order today on Amazon!

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Masterminds and Wingmen



Order today!
By Rosalind Wiseman 

The reviews are in,

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! 

Rosalind’s new book, Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Your Son Cope with School Yard Power, Locker Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Realities of Guy World, shows what’s really happening in boys’ lives. It creates a new language and analytical framework to understand the power of boys’ social hierarchies and how these influence their decision-making and emotional well-being. Order today!



Watch what people are saying:
 

Friday, September 6, 2013

Drive 4 Pledges Day September 19th - #ItCanWait

A Message from AT&T:

We’re encouraging you to not only pledge to never text and drive but to become an advocate for the cause by encouraging everyone to make a difference by sharing the movement with those who have yet to commit.

Wanting to take your pledge to the NEXT LEVEL? Individuals interested in doing more can sign up to become a “Personal Advocate” for the cause after pledging at ItCanWait.com where they will join a band of loyal supporters who are actively making a difference online and offline in their communities by spreading the It Can Wait message. Since 78% of teen drivers say they’re likely to not text and drive if friends tell them it’s wrong or stupid, we think we can make a big impact.

Learn more.



Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Mentoring Youths: Become a Mentor

Become A Mentor

Few bonds in life are more influential than those between a young person and an adult.

As you begin your journey toward becoming a mentor, you will need to thoroughly understand the role of mentoring. Look at a role you are already familiar with. Most of us have had a supervisor, a boss or coach who has made a positive difference in our lives. Those people wore many hats. They acted as, delegators, role models, cheerleaders, policy enforcers, advocates, and friends. As a mentor you will wear these same hats.
Mentors understand the need to assume a number of different roles during the course of a mentoring relationship, but successful mentors also share the same basic qualities:
  • A sincere desire to be involved with a young person.
  • Respect for young people.
  • Active listener.
  • Empathy.
  • See solutions and opportunities.
  • Be flexible and open.  
As you and your mentee begin your relationship; exploring values, interests and goals, you will find yourself making a difference and having a positive effect on their life. What you may also be surprised to see is that you will be learning more about yourself, too. Mentoring doesn't just affect the young person. Mentoring is a shared opportunity for learning and growth. Many mentors say that the rewards they gain are as substantial as those for their mentees. Being a mentor enables them to:
  • Have fun.
  • Achieve personal growth, learn more about themselves.
  • Improve their self-esteem and feel they are making a difference.
  • Gain a better understanding of other cultures and develop a greater appreciation for diversity.
  • Feel more productive and have a better attitude at work.
  • Enhance their relationships with their own children.
     
Good mentors are willing to take time to get to know their mentees, to learn new things that are important to the young person, and even to be changed by their relationship. Accept the challenges and rewards of mentoring a young person and experience the benefits that will last each of you a lifetime.

Go ahead—get started, find a mentoring opportunity today…

Learn more at www.mentoring.org.